Can Phalaenopsis Orchids Rebloom? Its a matter of light

The Phalaenopsis Orchid blooms at last!
Orchids are beautiful flowers. They look exotic, and tropical. They are so easy to keep that they are sold by grocery stores across the nation. All they require is a weekly watering and the right amount of light.

But once those beautiful blooms fade, they can be hard to get back. You might even wonder - do phalaenopsis orchids rebloom?

At first, my orchids refused to rebloom. I watered them regularly. I fertilized them. I moved them around the house from window to window. None of it worked. So imagine my excitement when two beautiful new flowers appeared on my second oldest orchid plant.

I have read a variety of guides which suggest temperature, water, and light as the triggers for orchid blooms. For me, the key was light.

The natural habitat of the Phalaenopsis Orchids

Phalaenopsis orchids (or "Moth Orchids") are epiphytes. That means that they grow on other plants - such as big leafy trees, which filter the sunlight.

Their native habitat is Indonesia and similar climates in south-east Asia and Australia. So keeping orchids successfully is all about mimicking their native habitat: bright filtered light, and the appropriate amount of humidity. Humidity can be provided by weekly watering, and perhaps a gravel bed filled with water under the pot. The orchids still get a bit dry during the winter (don't we all?) but they bounce back.

The trickier thing is getting the light right, since unless you want to go the grow light route, you are at the mercy of your residence's window placement.

Phalaenopsis orchid blooms

Orchid Flowers require the right levels of light

It really is all about the right level of light. Most guides will say that you need indirect light, but not all indirect light is equal.

When I started keeping orchids, all I had was a north facing window. There was nothing but indirect light. This kept the plants fairly healthy, but not happy. None of my orchids would bloom; the indirect light was not strong enough.

Then I moved, and put the orchids in a south facing window. The south facing window had direct light, and that was far too much for the plants. The edges of the leaves started turning brown. The sun was burning them. Too much light.

So I put my three phalaenopsis in a west facing window. They get a little bit of direct light in the late afternoon, but the window is shaded by several trees. This was just the right amount of light. Both of my older orchid plants have grown flower stalks!

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Can Phalaenopsis Orchids Rebloom? Its a matter of light

Orchids are beautiful flowers. They look exotic, and tropical. They are so easy to keep that they are sold by grocery stores across the nation. All they require is a weekly watering and the right amount of light. But once those beautiful blooms fade, they can be hard to get back. You might even wonder […]

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Last updated:
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